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Viewing all FaiV posts with topic: Money Management  

Week of September 27, 2019

1. Jobs: I've written a good bit here on the "Great Convergence" from the perspective of financial inclusion--that the US and middle-income countries have more in common in that domain than they have ever had--but another version of the "Great Convergence" is the common focus on jobs in countries across the per-capita income spectrum.
It's useful to put the current convergence in historical perspective--the recognition that creating jobs was critical and that "national champion" industrial development was not creating them played a large role in the development of the microfinance movement. The failure of microcredit to produce much beyond self-employment alternatives to casual labor has brought job creation, and especially job creation through SMEs, back to the top of the agenda of international development. At the same time, the failure of richer economies to produce very many "quality" jobs in the 10 years since the Great Recession (and arguably since the 1970s) or for the foreseeable future has put the question of jobs at the top of the list of concerns for policymakers in those countries.
Paddy Carter, the director of research for CDC (UK, not US), and Petr Sedlacek have a new report on how DFIs and social investors should think about job creation that lays out some of the issues (e.g. boosting productivity can both create and destroy jobs) quite nicely. MIT's "Work of the Future Task Force" also has a new report, this more from the perspective of policymakers in wealthier countries, with a call to focus on job quality more than job quantity. Stephen Greenhouse has a new book on dignity at work, which of course has a lot to do with job quality. Here's a talk he gave recently at Aspen's Economic Opportunities Program.
Seema Jayachandran has a new working paper on a specific part of the jobs conversation: how social norms limit women's labor market participation and what might be done about that. For me it also opens the question about microcredit-driven self-employment being a higher "dignity" job for women in many contexts than the jobs that are available to them otherwise. More on that in a moment.

2. Household Finance: I don't have a lot of links here, just some thoughts from conversations in the last few days. But to kick things off, Felix Salmon had a nice gibe at financial literacy this week that had my confirmation bias going. But in hindsight, I actually disagree: teaching financial literacy actually doesn't seem to be that hard based on the many papers that show that running a class leads to passing a financial literacy test. The hard part is making higher financial literacy pay off in terms of changed behavior. But there I agree with Felix's basic point: higher financial literacy doesn't lead to improved decision making for the poor or the wealthy. The wealthy just have more structure and protection (both formal in terms of regulation and practices at private firms who know better than to routinely screw profitable customers, and informal in terms of slack and cushion) from bad choices. On the flip side, Joshua Goodman has a new paper in the Journal of Labor Economics that finds that more compulsory high school math leads African-American students to complete more math coursework and to higher paying jobs (there's a nice little estimate that the return to additional math courses makes up half of the gains from an additional year of school).
Part one of "more on that in a moment" is that Seema with a rockstar list of development economists (Erica Field, Rohini Pande, Natalia Rigol, Simone Schaner and Charity Troyer Moore) has another new paper on whether access to, deposits into and training on using a personal bank account affects women's labor supply and gender norms. They find that it does increase women's labor supply and shifts norms to be more accepting of women working. Here's the indispensible Lyman Stone with a somewhat skeptical take on the interpretation of the data.
Finally, in a conversation with Northern Trust this week about their financial coaching work (see a recent summary here) a really fascinating insight came up: people in the coaching programs seem to have much more success when "saving" is framed as "debt reduction" than when it's framed as "saving." These sort of things always grab my attention because Jonathan's paper Borrowing to Save was a seminal piece for my interest and thinking in financial inclusion. But it also got me thinking: what would happen if retirement savings programs were framed as debt + loss aversion? Specifically, if when you started a job, the employer said: "I'm loaning you $10K, deposited into an IRA and you owe me $x monthly, until you pay it off--and if you don't I take it back." Obviously you couldn't run an experiment like that in the US because of regulations, but is there somewhere you could? Maybe someone has already done it? Let me know if you have any thoughts.

3. Digital Finance: I linked this a few weeks ago, but I keep coming back to it, so I'm going to link it again: CGAP's data set on how Kenyans use m-Pesa. MicroSave also has some new data on Kenya, built in partnership with the Smart Campaign and the SPTF, specifically on the prevalence and use of digital credit, which "highlights some positive signs and some persistent problems." Honestly I see a lot more of the persistent problems than of the positive signs.
That's reflected in a new post from David Porteous at Next Billion about the nearly completed FIBR project (no the acronym doesn't make any sense to me either) which looks at digitization and financial inclusion. Among the persistent problems: for most of the world digital finance isn't different from mobile money (in other words there isn't deeper engagement with formal finance by individuals or much progress on digitization of business finance), and new players with unclear (or non-existent) commitment to social goals are dominant. Let me expand quickly on one point that David frames positively which I am much more cautious of: the extension of digital credit to small business by large organizations with access to their data. Here's the home page of the Responsible Business Lending Coalition which exists because of all the ways that increased access to data and digitization is facilitating predatory small business lending in the US.
Speaking of new players, Juvo has "announced" "Financial Identity as a Service", complete with ridiculous acronym FiDaas). I'm not sure if there is a there there, but you can also guess my priors about this based on the above two paragraphs. And here's a WSJ piece on Google Pay's success in India, which came very much as a surprise to me. It turns out part of the reason is Google launched the service in India in advance of regulations that slowing competitors down.

4. Evidence/Methods: We often talk around here about the barriers to getting policymakers to take evidence into account in their decision-making. It turns out that a first step toward more evidence-based policy might be teaching statistics students not to be so availability-biased and frequentist.
Before you chuckle to yourself too much about psychology vs. economics, keep reading. Here's a new paper on the multiple testing problem that inevitably results from natural experiments--once one paper identifies the natural experiment there are often many other papers that follow using the same "event" to test other hypotheses. This is certainly not the last word, but it raises big questions. Stuart Buck has some big questions of his own about how to account for multiple hypothesis testing and how we should even think about these problems.
Another domain of economics research that hasn't gotten enough attention is how to do cost-benefit analysis that is meaningful from a policy perspective. Caitlin Tulloch has been all over this issue and she and her collaborators have a new report on best practices for cost-efficiency analysis of basic needs programs.
While it's not the sort of thing I usually include in methods, the AEA's climate survey report is out. And it makes it clear that the harassment of women and minorities in the economics discipline is in fact a method that has shaped and continues to shape the profession and the research.

5. Philanthropy: Speaking of methods that shape development economics--seeking funding from billionaire philanthropists is another core method that shapes the discipline. Here's an interaction I had with Justin Sandefur and others on how the intersection of demands of the profession, the state of evidence-based policymaking and the existence of large-scale philanthropy shapes what the median development economist should focus on. It's in part a preview of my chapter in the upcoming book on RCTs in development economics edited by Isabelle Guerin, Florent Bedecarrats and Francois Roubaud.
Here's Kelsey Piper making the positive case for the role of private mega-philanthropy, through the lens of modern contraception.
And here's a video of two of my favorite thinkers in philanthropy, Rob Reich and Phil Buchanan, fiercely debating each other about the role of private philanthropy in American society, based on their recent books (Rob's Just Giving; Phil's Giving Done Right). My sympathies lie more with Rob, but what I think is really going on in these conversations between Phil and Rob is about differing theories of change. Rob is trying to move the Overton Window on how we talk about philanthropy in order to create space for serious conversations about shifting policy; Phil is worried that Rob will shift the Overton Window too far too fast. But the best part is that I got to add to my idiosyncratic collection of books signed by the intellectual anti-thesis of the author (see also: Angus Deaton signing my copy of Poor Economics).

No particular reason that this came to mind. Source:  Stephan Pastis  And by the way, any parent with kids between 8 and 13, if you haven't stocked your house with the  entire Timmy Failure series by Pastis , you're doing parenting wrong.

No particular reason that this came to mind. Source: Stephan Pastis
And by the way, any parent with kids between 8 and 13, if you haven't stocked your house with the entire Timmy Failure series by Pastis, you're doing parenting wrong.

Week of March 1, 2019

The Post-Neoliberal Edition

1. Economics: The dismal science doesn't often generate positive reviews from outside the discipline, so when it does happen it's worth noting. Julia Rohrer, who in addition to having one of the best titled blogs I've ever seen, is a psychology graduate student who procrastinated on her dissertation by attending a summer program in economics. Here is her list of things she appreciated in economics as a positive contrast to her experience in psychology.
On the other hand (hah!), economists typically have a lot to say about what is wrong with economics--certainly I encounter more "friendly-fire" in the econ literature than when I dip my toes in other disciplines (though this is perhaps my favorite example of the intra-disciplinary critique). There's an ongoing discussion about the future of economics going on in the Boston Review--I don't know if that counts as friendly-fire in terms of the outlet, but the participants are economists--starting with an essay by Naidu, Rodrik and Zucman, Economics after Neoliberalism. Then there are responses from Marshall Steinbaum, who notes that "every new generation proclaims itself to have discovered empirical verification for the first time," and from Alice Evans who focuses on the nexus of economics and political power in the form of unions.
But, because it's me writing this, I have to close on a new paper in JDE, that finds that communal land tenure explains half of the cross-country agricultural productivity gap. And here's a piece about how small teams of researchers are more innovative than large teams. generate much more innovation than big teams Neo-liberalism won't go down without a fight!

2. Migration: I haven't touched on migration for a while so it felt serendipitous that Michael Clemens and Satish Chand put out an update to their paper first released in 2008(!) on the effects of migration on human capital development in Fiji. The basic story is that in the late 80's formal discrimination against Indian-Fijians increased sharply, causing the community to both increase emigration and investment in human capital to aid emigration prospects. The net effect, rather than the dreaded "brain drain," was to increase the stock of human capital in Fiji. grapes
Cross-border migration is really the only option in Fiji, but in many countries, like Indonesia, there are lots of internal migration options. Since there is typically a large gap in productivity within countries as well as between countries, internal migrationhas always been a part of the development story. Bryan and Morten have a new article in VoxDev about this process in Indonesia, looking at the productivity gains possible from removing barriers to internal migration.
Since we started off talking about Economics, here's a post from David McKenzie considering the effects of migration on economists--or more specifically, how to think about job market papers about a candidate's country-of-origin. True to his style, David goes deep, including a model, and a survey. The post was inspired by a tweet from Pablo Albarcar who later noted it was mostly a joke about "brain drain" worries.
It is surprising to me how tenacious the brain drain idea is. When I have conversations about it, I try to cite the literature like Clemens and Chand, but I rarely find that makes a dent. People can always find an objection. So I've taken to just asking people how they feel about the "destruction" of Brazilian soccer/football culture and skill due to the mass emigration of the most skilled players. Typically, that leads to several moments of silent blinking. If you're interested here's a paper about "Rodar" the circular human capital investment, migration and development among Brazilian footballers
  
3. US Poverty and Inequality: I typically try to avoid the grab-bag approach to items of interest but I'll confess this one is a bit of a grab bag with a variety of connecting threads. We'll start by connecting to a piece I included last week about tax refunds and saving. If you haven't read that, you should. I noted I was grateful for the piece because it meant I could skip the annual ritual of linking to a piece I wrote for SSIR several years ago about rethinking tax refunds. But I should have known that the zombie idea of tax refunds being bad personal finance wouldn't die so easily. Here's Neil Irwin from the NYT on how people being angry about lower refunds shows that "humans are not always rational." I'm struck by the irony that the continuing common use of "rational" in economics requires zero-cost attention, while a foundational truth of the discipline is "nothing is zero-cost." There is nothing irrational about paying a very small fee (in foregone interest) for the valuable service of helping you to save when other services are ineffective. That's especially true if you include, as you should, the cost of the tax advisors and financial advisors required to accurately calculate the proper amount of withholding and to choose the right investment/savings account in which to store those savings. So I guess that connects to the thread about economics maybe not being post-neoliberalism quite yet. And here's a column from the Washington Post's personal finance columnist withpush back on the "refunds are bad" idea from readers who explain their rational choices in their own words.  
This week a 3 year project by the National Academy of Sciences to provide a "nonpartisan, evidence-based report" on the most effective ways to reduce child poverty in the United States was released. The summary that most everyone is latching on to is that work supports are not going to get the job done. The only way to cut child poverty by at least half is direct cash support to parents. Here's the Vox overview.
If you were thinking about intergenerational poverty, you were probably also thinking about education. The last few years have seen a proliferation of videos of "poor kids" getting into elite schools. Here's a piece about a new book on what happens to the lower-income students once they arrive at elite schools. It's not so joyous--"money remains a requirement for full citizenship in college, despite institutional declarations to the contrary."
Finally, how much do financial incentives and tax rates affect the incentives to innovate and invent? Not much--exposure to innovation matters much more

4. Management: This is a last minute "swap" of an item, since David McKenziemaligned managers in his weekly links tweet this morning. As some of you know, I have a semi-secret identity ghost-writing and editing management books, with several of them specifically about Toyota and lean process and management, so I couldn't let it lie. Of course, David's quip was a joke. The piece he links to is a terrific overview of the research on how management matters, a literature that David is a significant contributor to. It is a topic that I wish the development field paid much much more attention to (I really hope this is the most clicked link of the week), and this overview is a great introduction, both in content and structure/organization. I think I'll make some of my papers look more like this in the future.
And here's a piece about how middle managers deserve more respect. In my read of the literature above, it is middle management that is the actual missing middle in development. 

5. Digital Finance: I relinked the piece on why there's no reason to trust blockchain in the notes above. Here's another reason: "Once Hailed as Unhackable, Blockchains Are Now Getting Hacked." On the other hand, here's, "Bitcoin Has Saved My Family," from a Venezuelan economist.
One of the under-examined topics in the emergence of digital finance is the shift in the organizations and organizational structures that are providing financial services. The institutions and people in telecoms are systematically different than those in finance. That's something that always strikes me as I look at the GSMA's annual report on the state of the mobile money industry. Not because of something in the report specifically, but the fact that the report is from the GSMA.
And finally, a little curiosity that may only interest me. Uganda is opening up the purchase of government debt to individuals using mobile money, on the theory that it will reduce the government's dependence on commercial banks and institutional investors. It's historically sound, but I'm skeptical. For instance, it hasn't worked as well as hoped in Kenya.  

The musing on the quality of Brazilian football in the face of mass emigration gives me an excuse to include a video in support of my argument. If you're interested in falling down the rabbit hole a bit, here's  a short documentary on the 1982 Brazil team , which is my Platonic ideal of how the game is supposed to be played. Though that could have something to do with the fact that I was 9 that summer, and it was the first World Cup I watched. I still have a visceral rage reaction any time I see the Azurri take the field.  

The musing on the quality of Brazilian football in the face of mass emigration gives me an excuse to include a video in support of my argument. If you're interested in falling down the rabbit hole a bit, here's a short documentary on the 1982 Brazil team, which is my Platonic ideal of how the game is supposed to be played. Though that could have something to do with the fact that I was 9 that summer, and it was the first World Cup I watched. I still have a visceral rage reaction any time I see the Azurri take the field.  

The First Week of August, 2018

US Policy Edition

Editor's Note: The faiV hiatus continues. This week's edition is edited by John Thompson, Chief Program Officer at the Center for Financial Services Innovation. Next week, we'll have one more guest editor before I climb back in the saddle.--Tim Ogden

1. FinTech Charters: Just as the industry takes off for summer vacation, the US Treasury Department released its long-awaited fintech report and the OCC issued a call for fintech charter submissions. I’ve spent the past week sorting through scores of analyses and reactions. Here's American Banker on takeaways from the Treasury report and from the OCC's announcement. What does this mean for all things financial inclusion and innovation? Well, it certainly opens the door for many providers to expand their reach and their potential impact. It will likely be an expensive and involved path, but one that could ultimately give some fintechs much needed lift. However, this is still early in the game. I would expect to see lawsuits and challenges from incumbents now that the charter program is official.     


2. Financial Stress and the Lunar Cycle: For many consumers, the end of the month represents constant instability as accounts are reduced to zero and bills become due.  While income volatility is the umbrella issue, the specific actions that trigger this instability on a cyclical basis live both in our minds and in the products we use.  One of our Entreprenuers-in-Residence, Corey Stone, tackles some big thinking on the topic in his series End of the Month. Drop in regularly to learn more about how human behavior can lead to suboptimal decision making, why long accepted product standards lead to this paucity of funds at the end of the month, and other insights into our monthly budgeting woes.

3. The Gig Economy: The difference between 4% and 40% is pretty significant. And the fact that the US Government doesn’t know how big the gig economy is, in short, a problem. To be fair, it’s not all the government’s fault. The variance in numbers can be attributed to a wide range of perceptions about what constitutes gig employment: full-time, part-time, etc. But no matter what the measurement, the impact is real. Gig employees enjoy the benefits of self-determination, but can often miss out on many of the benefits of traditional employment like insurance, savings vehicles, and more. The result can be regular cash flow gaps and challenging financial tradeoffs. To better design products and create guardrails, it’s imperative that we all find a better – more credible – way to measure this new workforce reality.

4. Fintech Flyovers: Who knew that Dwolla was launching a Midwestern Movement way back in 2010 when it opened its doors in Des Moines. Since then, the Midwest has caught more than its fair share of attention for entrepreneurs, incubators and investors. Drawn by a low cost of living and a relaxed measure of success, companies can stretch a dollar further and pursue a longer term growth plan. Of course, it has its challenges with recruitment – but quality of life seems to be winning out. I can personally attest to the lure as CFSI is headquartered in Chicago and I am a fintech founder from and long-time resident Kansas City. This Midwestern potential will only gain steam with the new OCC fintech charter. Mary Wisniewski tracks this and much more in her most recent piece from American Banker.

5. What We're Slacking About at CFSI: Spies: they are just like us. Who knew that financial health is an issue for international agents? Summer means vacation time, but are you among the millions of US workers who feel like a week isn’t enough to truly dial down the stress of the workplace? Try scheduling vacation bookends. Wearables have made a huge impact on measuring physical health (and giving us all an excuse to get up and walk around throughout the day without looking thoroughly out of place). We’re carefully watching the launch of the “Fitbit for Financial Health” to track similar outcomes.

First Week of May, 2018

For the First Time in Forever

Editor's Note: I apologize if the phrasing on the first item triggers PTSD symptoms in parents of children under 10. In other news, the paywall revolution seems to be gaining steam. I may need to start a Patreon for the faiV to afford subscriptions, but for now I'm just mourning my two favorite columnists, Justin Fox and Matt Levine, disappearing behind Bloomberg's odd paywall. --Tim Ogden

1. Microfinance, Part I (Uses of Credit): For the first time in forever, it seems there's enough new and interesting stuff on microfinance to support not only one, but a couple multiple-link items. Let's start with a useful piece that summarizes findings from several studies that have loomed large in our understanding (or questions about) of how microenterprises use credit, and apparent differences between male-owned and female-owned enterprises. I do find the framing a bit odd, as I don't know anyone who interpreted the results as "women aren't as good at running microenterprises as men" rather than, "women tend to be constrained to operating microenterprises in less profitable industries." When the newer results from Bernhardt, Field, Pande and Rigol emerged, I think the standard take was, "Households optimally allocate credit to their highest-return enterprise." So I think the intriguing thing here is not "women vs men entrepreneurs" but "maybe the industries women are concentrated in aren't less profitable after all." And that makes me think back to a paper from AEA (there's no version online that I can find, but this seems to be a significantly revised version using the same data) finding that female tailors in Ghana earn less than male tailors because they are constrained to making womens' clothes, a sector where there is more competition and lower prices.
Another use of credit for poor households is not to invest in a microenterprise but to smooth consumption when income is seasonal (or volatile for other reasons). Here's a new paper from Fink, Jack, and Masiye examining that dynamic in rural Zambia. Providing credit during the lean season affects the labor market, allowing liquidity-constrained farmers to avoid wage labor for their comparatively less-constrained neighbors, and pushes up wages. The intriguing thing here is another piece of evidence on the general equilibrium effects of microcredit via commodity (in this case, labor) markets.


2. Microfinance, Part II (Everything Else): Well, not everything else, see item 4. Access to credit and other financial services is a tricky thing--and it's not just the financial system that affects it, the justice system, criminal and civil, matters a lot too. Here's a new paper on alternative credit scoring using digital footprints--I haven't read it yet but am generally very skeptical of things like this. Grassroots Capital and CGAP are hosting a webinar on May 15th under the heading "Microfinance: Revolution or Footnote?" based on a conference last year (full disclosure, I was a participant). Of course, now I would want it to be called "Revolution, Footnote, or General Equilibrium Effects Eat Us All in the Long Run?" And applications are open for the 2018 European Microfinance Awards (until May 23) with the theme "Inclusive Finance through Technology." Whoever said the faiV didn't have news you could use? 

3. Methods/Statistics/Etc: Here's even more service journalism: A tool that will convert charts into data points automatically. I actually expect this to be the most clicked link in the history of the faiV. RAs, the robots are coming for your jobs sooner than you think.
Does everyone who cares about statistics read Andrew Gelman's blog regularly? Just in case, there were several posts recently that drew my attention. One is a fairly-standard-but-always-useful post about a specific example of dubious practices, on early childhood education (which morphs into some commentary on how the field of economics deals with these issues with a bonus appearance from Guido Imbens in the comments); another is a pointer to a new paper that tries to avoid some of the more dubious practices on a topic of a lot of interest and a lot of noise--the relationship of macro-growth and child development. But the most interesting is a post about how economists tend to see the world, specifically explaining why apparent bad behavior is good, and apparent good behavior is bad. Behavior in the economics profession is the best segue I can find into this short (audio) interview with Claudia Goldin.
But back to the use and misuse of metrics and statistics. If you don't click on anything else under this item, I do think you should look at these last two links. First, a thread about how most of the world thinks about statistics--as a tool for arriving at the answer you're looking for. And a column from Justin Fox on how pro- and anti-metrics authors end up in basically the same place--measurement is hard, and is only useful if you put the effort into doing it right.

4. Household Finance: Maybe the grab-bag is the right frame for this week's edition of the faiV. I'm including this item just so I could add this link to a look at how terribly non-poor people manage their money. One of the themes I've been increasingly talking about since the US Financial Diaries is how much even small amounts of slack obscure the sub-optimal decisions of the upper 60% of the income distribution. The analogy I make is to lean manufacturing: for the poorest people, we have drained all the slack out of the system so that when any mistake is made the consequences are large and obvious--that's the point of lean! But of course, unlike Toyota which spends massively to train workers on how to deal with mistakes, we give no useful training to these people to cope with their lack of slack, instead just blathering on to them with useless financial literacy training. Meanwhile, those with some slack are the American car companies of the 1970s, oblivious to their poor management of money. This week is when people who filed their US taxes right before the deadline will receive any refunds they were due; my strong prior is that there will be much more money wasted--even as a percentage--in the next 30 days than when the comparatively lower income families received their refunds back in February.
While we're at it, would you consider $200,000 of debt and a payment plan with the IRS for back taxes an example of "bad" financial decisions? What if the person in question was running for governor?

5. Cash Transfers: To round things out, Finland is giving up on it's "not-universal basic income" experiment since voters don't like it and they sort of already have an actual "universal basic welfare" system. There's another "not-universal basic income/cash transfer" experiment starting in the US. And here's Martin Ravallion on the pros and cons of guaranteed employment versus guaranteed income. (Channeling my inner Lant Pritchett: It's about state capacity!).   

Part of the US inequality story that doesn't get quite as much attention, via the  NY Times Upshot .

Part of the US inequality story that doesn't get quite as much attention, via the NY Times Upshot.

Week of December 4, 2017

In terms of this week's through-line, I figured I might as well get in on the Star Wars jokes that are going to plague us all, apparently, for the rest of time--Tim Ogden

1. Social Investment: Last week I was at European Microfinance Week. Video of the closing plenary I participated in is here. My contribution was mainly to repeat what seems to me a fairly obvious point but which apparently keeps slipping from view: there are always trade-offs and if social investors don't subsidize quality financial services for poor households, there will be very few quality financial services for poor households.
Paul DiLeo of Grassroots Capital (who moderated the session at eMFP) pointed me to this egregious example of the ongoing attempt to fight basic logic and mathematics from the "no trade-offs" crowd. This sort of thing is particularly baffling to me because of the close connection that impact investing has to investing--a world where everything is about trade-offs: risk vs. return; sector vs. sector; company vs. company; hedge fund manager vs. hedge fund manager. The logic in this particular case, no pun intended, is that a fund to invest in tech start-ups in the US Midwest is an impact investment, even though the founder explicitly says it isn't, because it is "seeking potential return in parts of the economy neglected by biases of mainstream investors." If that's your definition of impact investing you're going to have a tough time keeping the Koch Brothers, Sam Walton and Ray Dalio out of your impact investment Hall of Fame. Sure, part of the argument is that these are investments that could create jobs in areas that haven't had a lot of quality job growth. But by that logic, mining BitCoin is a tremendous impact investment. You see, mining BitCoin and processing transactions is enormously energy intensive. And someone's got to produce that energy, and keep the grid running. Those electrical grid jobs are one of the few high paying, secure mid-skill jobs. Never mind that BitCoin mining is currently increasing its energy use every day by 450 gigawatt-hours, or Haiti's annual electricity consumption. And, y'know, reversing the trend toward more clean energy. Hey anyone remember the good old days of "BitCoin for Africa"?


2. Philanthropy: There are plenty of trade-offs and questions about impact in philanthropy, not just in impact investing, and not just in programs. Here's a piece I wrote with Laura Starita about making the trade-offs of foundations investing in weapons, tobacco and the like more transparent.
I could have put David Roodman's new reassessment of the impact of de(hook)worming in the American South in early 20th century under a lot of headings (for instance, Roodman once again raises the bar on research clarity, transparency and data visualizations; Worm Wars is back!; etc.). The tack I'm going to take, in keeping with the prior item, is the impact of philanthropy. The deworming program was driven by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission and is frequently cited, not only as evidence for current deworming efforts, but as evidence for the value and impact of large scale philanthropy. Roodman, using much more data than was available when Hoyt Bleakley wrote a paper about it more than 10 years ago, finds that there isn't compelling evidence that the Rockefeller program got the impact it was looking for. Existing (and continuing) trends in schooling and earnings appear unaltered. 
Ben Soskis has a good overview of the seminal role hookworm eradication had in the creation of American institutional philanthropy. His post was spurred by an article I linked back in the fall about the return of hookworm in many of the places it was (supposedly?) eradicated from by Rockefeller's philanthropy. We may need to rewrite a lot of philanthropic history to reflect that the widely cited case study in philanthropic impact didn't eradicate hookworm and may not have had much effect. And while we're in the revision process, it may be useful to reassess views on the impact of the Ford Foundation-sponsored Green Revolution: a new paper that argues that there was no measurable impact on national income and the primary effect was keeping people in rural farming communities (as opposed to migrating to urban areas). Given what we now generally know about the value to rural-to-urban migration, that means likely significant negative long-term effects.
If you care about high quality thinking about philanthropy, democracy and charitable giving in general, which I of course think you should, you should also be paying attention to some of Ben Soskis' other current writing. Here he is moderating a written discussion of Americans' giving capacity. And here's a piece about how the Soros conspiracy theories are damaging real debate about the role of large scale philanthropy in democratic societies.
In the spirit of the holidays, I feel like I should wrap up an item on philanthropy with some good news. In the last full edition of the faiV I mentioned the MacArthur Foundation's 100&Change initiative, which is picking one idea to get $100 million to "solve" a problem. For all the problems I have with that, the program is doing something really interesting, thanks to Brad Smith and the Foundation Center. All of the proposals, not just the finalists, are now publicly available for other foundations to review.

3. Frustrated Employees: One of the core conceits of the microfinance movement is the idea that many (most?) poor people are frustrated entrepreneurs, with lots of ideas and opportunities available if only they had access to credit. It's one of the reasons that we didn't get the impact we were looking for from massive expansion of microcredit.
The idea of frustrated entrepreneurs still lives on for a lot of the general public, but I think (hope?) it's been largely abandoned within the core of the industry. But just in case, I thought I would pass along some more evidence that the poor are frustrated employees, not frustrated entrepreneurs. Here's a paper looking at small enterprise owners in Mexico, who shrink their businesses when jobs come to town, in anticipation presumably of giving up the grind of entrepreneurship for the dream of a paycheck. And here's a look at Thai entrepreneurs operating multiple micro-enterprises that concludes that it's not lack of credit that's holding back their businesses, but their own lack of skills.
One of the paradoxes of the microfinance movement was that co-existing with the idea that the poor were frustrated entrepreneurs just waiting to be unleashed was the emphasis on providing a loan with conditions that made entrepreneurial risk-taking difficult if not impossible. Field and Pande showed quite a while ago that if you relaxed the constraints on loan payment, some borrowers would make riskier investments and gain from it. Here's a recent follow-up to that work which adds further evidence--again finding that borrowers with a more flexible contract end up with higher business sales, but also that the contract does a good job of inducing self-selection of borrowers who do have more of the necessary characteristics for entrepreneurial success.
It's not just people in lower income countries that are frustrated employees. Many employees are frustrated employees--frustrated that the jobs they have are terrible. Here's Zeynep Ton on the case for relieving that frustration and creating better jobs.

4. Our Algorithmic Overlords: A couple of quick hits here. First, the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services tried to use big data and algorithms to predict which children were at most risk. They're scrapping the program "because it didn't seem to be predicting much."
And here's Zeynep Tufecki on the dystopia we're building "just to make people click on ads." Definitely not the impact we were looking for.

5. Household Finance: If there's any impact the microfinance movement was not looking for, it was to replicate the troubling situation with debt that we see in many lower income American (and European, though to a lesser extent) households. It's one of the reasons the industry was so fixated on emphasizing that they were making entrepreneurial loans not consumption loans. The Urban Institute has a new interactive map on debt in America, with data down to the county level. There's a lot to explore there--CityLab has a nice summary overview if you just want some takeaways. The Mimosa Index is doing something conceptually similar for microfinance, albeit at a much grosser level due to data constraints. Hey, MicroSave what about doing something like this for digital credit in Kenya?
And to tie everything together, from trade-offs to impact, here's some new work from Emily Gallagher and Jorge Sabat (via Ray Boshara's blog post) on the trade-offs households have to make between savings and debt--finding (in the US) that the short-term sub-optimal choice of saving at low interest rates while carrying high-interest debt pays off in the medium-term. The mechanism is having some liquidity to meet shocks without running up more debt. I have some ideas (and some organizations willing to try them) about how to maintain liquidity while reducing debt, so if you'd be interested in funding a pilot, just let me know. 
Ray's post is motivated by thanking his dad for giving him advice as a teenager to always have some savings on hand, even if it meant ultimately paying more in interest on loans, advice that now has an empirical basis. I can't let that opportunity for one of my standard harangues pass by: the state of personal finance advice is horrific. Here's a piece from the NY Times this week which under the heading of getting "better at money in 2018" advises readers that cutting out small indulgences can add up and that they should spend more on take-out to be happy. Gosh I wonder which of those pieces of advice is more likely to be taken?  

Via Barbara Magnoni of EA Consultants, a little video about international remittances to hopefully brighten your weekend. It's certainly better than a Star Wars joke.

Week of November 6, 2017

The Conundrum Synthesis Edition

Editor's Note: This week I attended a 2-day AspenEPIC meeting on consumer debt (in the US) and then a day with the Filene Institute on the "Mind-Money Connection." This week's title is inspired by some of Ray Boshara's comments at EPIC about conundrums in understanding consumer debt. But both events once again illustrated the desperate need for more synthesis of ideas and experience between the developing world and the developed world on financial inclusion. Ray also pointed out to me that while I introduced myself when I took over writing the faiV nearly 2 years ago, it's not apparent on a regular basis who the "I" is. So from now on, I'm going to sign these notes each week--Tim Ogden

1. Appropriate Frictions and End-User Behavior: A key theme of the EPIC conversations on debt from my perspective was the importance of differential frictions in access to various kinds of debt. One example: it's much more time consuming to open a home equity line of credit than a credit card account. There are reasons for that of course: we want people to be careful about borrowing against their home, because we fear the consequences for people if they default. But the cost of unsecured credit is so much higher, and various forms of debt are so interlinked, that households can end up in worse straits precisely because we tried to protect them. The true conundrum of appropriate frictions is that the process of determining the best form of credit for a household is in itself a friction that drives consumers toward those willing to provide credit without a care for its impact on the household--a somewhat obtuse but accurate way of describing predatory lenders.
This is one of the lessons from microcredit. Demand for microcredit in most contexts is actually quite low, and rarely did microcredit have much of an impact on local moneylenders. The reason of course being that taking a microloan usually involves a lot of friction, while borrowing from a moneylender is low friction. Those operating in the US will immediately see the exact overlap with payday/auto-title lending vs. working with a community development credit union.
But it's not just a question of the behavior of consumers. Front-line staff also play a role; they are an under-recognized form of end-user that has to be taken into account. Here's some new work by Beisland, D'Espallier and Mersland on "personal mission drift" among credit officers of Ecuadorian MFIs. Now don't look away because this is about microcredit or Ecuador--it's directly applicable to any kind of financial service offered to any kind of customer anywhere. Beisland et al. find that as credit officers gain experience they tend to serve fewer "vulnerable" clients (e.g. smaller loans, young borrowers, disabled borrowers). Why? Because it takes too much time--there are those frictions again. Figuring out how to offer quality products, especially credit, with appropriate frictions for both the borrowers and the credit officer, is a conundrum everywhere.
For further evidence of this, check out the similarities between this piece from Bindu Ananth about conversations with newly banked customers in Indian cities, and this report on "Generational Money Chatter" in the US from Hope Schau and Ignacio Luri (especially from GenXers and Millennials). The common theme I perceive: lots of questions and uncertainties about products and providers, little faith in the "systems," and confusion about where to turn for trustworthy advice.    


2. Frictions, Temptation and Digital Finance: Those of you working in the digital finance world may already be thinking about how digital tools can lower frictions--after all, not only can FinTech tools more quickly and easily gather data from consumers, but they often cut the front-line staff right out of the equation! Take that, friction!
Oh but friction can be useful. This is one of those areas where I'm constantly baffled at the disconnect between the developed and developing worlds. In the developed world, it's generally understood that the goal of payment and digital finance innovation is usually to remove friction specifically for the purpose of getting people to spend more money, more often. Amazon didn't develop and patent one-click ordering out of concern for saving people time (Interesting side note, Amazon's patent on one-click expired last month--exogenous variation klaxon!). The sales pitch that credit card issuers make to merchants has always been that credit cards induce people to spend more.
Here's one of my favorite new pieces of research in a long time: a study of how people in debt management plans handled spending temptation (if that description is too dry to get you to click, try this one: "Target is the Devil!"). The sub-text, and sometimes text, is how hard retailers and some credit providers work to break down the frictions that prevent people from spending.
What's the connection to digital finance, particularly in developing countries. I'll enter there through this piece from Graham Wright based on a debate at the recent MasterCard Foundation Symposium on Financial Inclusion. Graham was asked to make the argument against the hope for digital finance serving poor customers. His list of five reasons why digital finance is "largely irrelevant" in the typical rural village is worth reading at face value. But it's also worth thinking about in terms of how much of digital finance is aimed at removing frictions, how it's failed to remove some of those frictions for poorer customers and what can (or will) happen to poor households when appropriate frictions are removed.

3. Quality Jobs: Another conundrum that deserves more global synthesis is the struggle to create quality jobs for low-income households. Certainly one factor of quality jobs is how much they pay. While there's little doubt that productivity has a big role to play in wages, it's not always clear, particularly since 1973 (the year I was born, coincidence?) how close that link is. Stansbury and Summers have a draft of a paper arguing that the link is still pretty strong. Josh Bivens and Larry Mishel push back, arguing that policies that undermined workers' power led to a divergence of wage growth and productivity growth, and a continuing decline in jobs that pay well enough to be quality jobs.
The stagnant wages for many workers since the 1970s is one of the reasons it's clear to me that it is no longer sufficient to look at having a job as binary. Here's a new review on jobs and recidivism that finds evidence that the quality of job is what matters in helping the formerly incarcerated stay out of prison. Here's a paper from Haltiwanger, Hyatt and McEntarfer on another aspect of job quality--a chance to move up the "job ladder"--and who is getting the opportunity to move up. The surprising news: less-educated workers are more likely to move from a low-productivity firm to a high-productivity one (which should lead to higher wages, but per Mishel et al above, perhaps not).
There's more than one way to take on raising the quality of jobs. Here's work from Akram, Chowdhury and Mobarak on the effect of people moving out of poor areas for better jobs. In short, they are studying a program that subsidizes rural Bangladeshi villagers migrating to cities during the low agricultural season. We already know that raises the wages of the migrants, but it also helps those who don't migrate by tightening the labor market in the villages. Here's where I have to mention that geographic mobility in the US is declining. Meanwhile, take the example of Chicago where segregation continues to shut people out of access to quality jobs, and more. Time for more programs to help Chicagoans migrate, I think, perhaps by reducing some of the frictions.

4. Evidence-Based Policy: Rachel Glennerster examines several cases where evidence led to scaling up programs, asking "When do innovation and evidence change lives?" She doesn't mention the scale-up of the seasonal migration program in Bangladesh mentioned above, but highlights several different models of research and scaling. For those more technically minded, Eva Vivalt has a new version of her paper and an accompanying blog post on research generalizability--how much we can expect a research finding to hold when it is tried elsewhere (or just scaled up). But if you're just looking for examples of research findings that did or didn't hold in differing contexts, take a look at this thread responding to Jess Hoel's appeal for examples to use in her teaching. 
Of course one factor in how generalizable research findings are is the contexts the research is conducted in. David Evans mapped the papers presented at the recent NEUDC conference in three ways (see the comments for the third one). Do you see too much concentration?

5. Neoliberalism: Finally, here's Dani Rodrik on the state of economics and the use of the term neoliberalism. I'm not going to pretend that I can do the piece justice in summary form, so I'll just provide the link and tell you to click on it. Here's the backstory of how the piece ended up in Boston Review.

In case you were too lazy to click on the link to  David Evans' mapping  of 2017 NEUDC papers, here's the first chart. To get the other two, you're going to have to click. And scroll. Via  Development Impact .

In case you were too lazy to click on the link to David Evans' mapping of 2017 NEUDC papers, here's the first chart. To get the other two, you're going to have to click. And scroll. Via Development Impact.

Week of September 18, 2017

The New and the Old Edition

Editor's Note: Most of the items this week are in some way new additions to items that have been featured in the faiV the last few months, or at least updates on some long-running themes.

1. Microenterprise and Household Finance: I assume that most of you are familiar with David McKenzie's business plan competition in Nigeria (there's even a Planet Money episode about it!) and his cash drop work (I have to use this self-serving link of course). David and co-authors have a new paper in Science (summary/blog version here) testing the effectiveness of business training for microenterprises in Togo and find that a standard business curricula did not do much (in line with lots of other business training studies, though most are plagued by too little power) but a curriculum based on boosting personal initiative did have large effects.
I see this as lining up with a stream of research finding that boosting aspirations or "hope" can have meaningful impact in many different contexts (see for instance, this recent work on effects of watching Queen of Katwe) and through a variety of interventions (any one know of an overview of recent work in this vein?). It also helps explain why there seem to be only small effects of business training on businesses that objectively should have lots of gains from marginal improvements in operations--if you don't believe that running your microenterprise better will matter...
In other microenterprise/microcredit news, I learned this week about a study (new draft coming soon apparently) that tests allocating microcredit based on peer views of microenterprise owner business skills. Those ranked highly do in fact see large returns to a $100 cash drop (8.8 to 13% monthly returns). I heard about the study from this excellent thread from Dina Pomeranz on a talk by Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo on what new they've learned since that "old" book Poor Economics came out.
Finally, here's a new piece from Bindu Ananth that should go on your "must read" list. I couldn't agree with this statement more: "[T]he field of household finance has failed to examine the financial lives of low-income families in sufficient detail." She examines specifically issues with how to think about insurance vs. savings, high frequency saving and borrowing, and financial complexity. I will continue to beat the drum on two points: 1) low-income households are having to make financial decisions that would challenge a finance MBA, with large consequences for sub-optimal choices, and 2) almost all the advice we have on making wise financial choices is built on an assumption that the life-cycle model holds true, and may not in fact be good advice if the life-cycle model doesn't hold.


2. Premium Mediocre and American Inequality: I'll lead this off with a concept that I'm not quite sure what to make of, but does have me thinking: Premium Mediocre. The post goes on way way too long, but it's worth reading at least through the first couple of scrolls for some new ways to think about the old problems of inequality and mobility, or lack thereof, and what it does to household decision making.
This summer I mentioned but failed to link to a study on how delivering food stamps more frequently lowered the rate of shoplifting in grocery stores in Chicago. Here's a new paper that shows a much larger and long-term effect of food stamp receipt. Children whose families received food stamps for more years (due to staggered roll out of the program in the 60s and 70s) were less likely to be convicted of any crime as an adult, with larger effects on violent crime.
The importance of such safety net programs in the United States is growing as we learn more about how household finances are changing. Not only is year-to-year volatility seemingly increasing, and month-to-month volatility seemingly spreading, but lifetime earnings aren't just stagnant--they're falling. Some new work indicates that since the late 1960's American men's expected lifetime earnings began falling each year (into the present). That can make premium mediocre a stretch for each new cohort. It also perhaps helps explain this new and fairly shocking chart, based on Case and Deaton's work discussed extensively in the faiV this spring, that has been circulating on Twitter this week.  


3. RCTs, observations and fieldwork: A new entry into the "value of RCTs" debate from well outside the development economics field: online advertising. Gordon et. al. look at data from 15 Facebook advertising experiments (500 million observations) and find significant differences in results using RCTs vs more post-hoc observational methods. The major conclusion as I see it: you're never going to figure out the unobservables well enough to control for them. In related news, here's a good piece about "researcher degrees of freedom" from the Monkey Cage Blog. And in only sort of related news, here's Tyler Cowen on the manifold harms of Facebook (besides making researchers jealous about the size of their n's)
Closer to home in development economics, here's 6 questions for Chris Udry about fieldwork and learning and teaching economics. I would have asked different questions but then you knew that.

4. Philanthropy and Systemic Change: Last week I linked to a piece about the return of hookworm in impoverished parts of the US. There's another side of that story: the supposed eradication of hookworm in the American South has long been the benchmark example of philanthropic success (and the gains from the eradication campaign are part of the evidence base for deworming today). Ben Soskis takes a look at what the persistence of hookworm, or the lack of persistence of the eradication campaign, says about the limits of public health philanthropy (or any kind of "systemic change" driven by philanthropy).
Here's Felix Salmon reporting from what was apparently definitely not a "premium mediocre" philanthropy conference, where the focus was apparently on "invisible causes and effects." If you have any interest in philanthropic strategy or a bent toward "evidence-based giving" it's worth a read.

5. Household Finance and American Inequality Redux: It's new and old all in the same edition. Here are a couple of things that I wanted to include before they got too out-of-date. First, PWC has a new report on the effects of financial stress on workers. It's almost comically bad, honestly, because they so often seem to miss the story. For instance, while focusing on how self-identified "stressed" workers are likely to withdraw early from their retirement funds (or not have made deposits in the first place), they miss the large percentage of "not stressed" employees who are acting the same way as the stressed ones. When 30% of "not stressed" people already know they are going to need to draw down their retirement savings early, you have a problem with your system.
Finally, here's a proposal to allow people to withdraw up to $500 from their Earned Income Tax Credit early in the year to help cope with financial emergencies. Alex Horowitz sounds the proper notes of skepticism on the Federal Government being able to deliver funds in anything like the amount of time that a financial emergency necessitates. One challenge the piece doesn't discuss is that people generally don't know what size their credit is going to be (or even that they qualify for it at all), a challenge exacerbated by income and other household volatility. That's the subject of a paper USFD co-authored with Urban and the topic of a panel next week at the Tax Policy Center. If you're in DC, come along.

Week of August 7, 2017

Editor's Note: It's the middle of August, so I thought it would be fun to change pace and have a faiV of just visualizations, graphics and videos. Or the most interesting things I saw this week all had visual elements.

The faiV will be off the next 2 weeks. See you in September.
 

1. The Global Middle Class: By now, Branko Milanovic's elephant chart should be quite familiar. Nancy Birdsall of CGD has a new post about the state of the global middle class that delves into the elephant chart and other data looking at the state of the middle class globally.

2. Global Inequality: Another chart that may be somewhat familiar but certainly should be top of mind these days. Our World in Data looks at inequality, from a lot of perspectives, here before and after taxes and benefits in developed countries.

3. US Inequality (and Debt): Speaking of inequality before and after redistribution, Catherine Rampell at the Washington Post has a couple of interesting recent posts on policy to help (or not) lower-income workers. The first chart here made lots of waves this week in a post by David Leonhardt, and provides the visceral oomph behind the need to reassess policy in the US. Although this data and similar charts have been circulating for quite awhile, it still thankfully grabs attention.

Whether or not the top chart is related to the bottom chart is one of the questions that Aspen's EPIC is taking on this year. Regardless of the direct connection between income inequality and rising debt, the fact that we are back to record levels of credit card debt seems concerning since it's likely not the .001 percent taking on this debt. That being said, rising debt could also be a sign that finally consumer confidence is returning and people feel that their incomes may start rising again.

Our Broken Economy, in One Simple Chart

Our Broken Economy, in One Simple Chart

U.S. Credit-Card Debt Surpasses Record Set at Brink of Crisis

U.S. Credit-Card Debt Surpasses Record Set at Brink of Crisis

4. Statistics GIFS: You can't say I don't know my audience--you guys go crazy for things like this, at least that's what the click data says. The two images at the top are from Rafael Irizarry at Simply Stats, in a post about teaching statistics and how to think about data. Helpfully, the post includes the code to recreate each of the images (and he's got a lot more where these came from).

This week there was also a revival of the Autodesk post about how visualizations can mislead that I featured a while back. It's here again because Jeff Mosenskis of IPA made an underappreciated awesome joke about also being wary of violin plots.

simpsons-paradox.gif

5. Low Quality Equilibria: I couldn't pass this one up when I saw it this week, given my recent rants. Who knew that removing frictions from sharing market information would make it impossible to ever tell if any product was good or not?

Week of June 12, 2017

1. St. Monday, American Inequality and Class Struggle: One of my favorite things about writing the faiV is when I get the chance to point readers to something they would likely never come across otherwise. So how about a blog post from a woodworking tool vendor about 19th century labor practices, craft unions and the gig economy? Once you read that, you'll want to remind yourself about this piece from Sendhil Mullainathan about employment as a commitment device (paper here), and this paper from Dupas, Robinson and Saavedra on Kenyan bike taxi drivers' version of St. Monday.

Back to modern America, here's Matt Bruenig on class struggle and wealth inequality through the lens of American Airlines, Thomas Picketty and Suresh Naidu. I feel a particular affinity for this item this week having watched American Airlines employees for a solid 12 hours try to do their jobs while simultaneously giving up the pretense that they have any idea what is going on. 


2. Our Algorithmic Overlords: Facebook is investing a lot in machine learning and artificial intelligence. Sometimes that work isn't about getting you to spend more time on Facebook...or is it? With researchers at Georgia Tech, Facebook has been working on teaching machines to negotiate by "watching" human negotiations. One of the first things the machines learned was to "deceive." I use quotes here because while it's the word the researchers use, I'm not sure you can use the word deceive in this context. And that's not the only part of the description that seems overly anthropomorphic.

Meanwhile, Lant Pritchett has a new post at CGD that ties together Silicon Valley, robots, labor unions, migration and development. And probably some other things as well. If I read Lant correctly, he would approve of Facebook's negotiating 'bots since negotiation is a scarce and expensive resource (though outsourcing negotiation is filled with principal-agent problems). I guess that means a world where robots are negotiating labor contracts for low- and mid-skill workers would be a better one than the one we're currently in? 

3. Statistics, Research Quality and External Validity: Here's another piece from Lant on external validity and multi-dimensional considerations when trying to systematize education evidence. A simpler way to put it: He's got some intriguing 3-dimensional charts that allow for thinking a bit more carefully about likely outcomes of interventions, given multiple factors influence how much a child learns in school. It closely parallels some early conversations I've had for my next book with Susan Athey and Guido Imbens, so I'm paying close attention. And if you can't get enough Lant, you could always check out my current book. Yes, both of those sentences are shameless plugs.

4. Household Finance: If you read the faiV regularly you know I think about household finance a lot and how little we really know about household finance decisions. Viviana Zelizer is a sociologist who opened a lot of vistas on household finance--particularly on the importance of understanding that money has meaning. Money isn't just a store of value, it's a store of values. Here's Zelizer on new research into how households use money (which may mention a recent project I've been a part of) from the LA Review of Books. Here's a very different, but complementary, view on issues of household finance and values: how much should someone save for retirement. I usually hate pieces like this, but this one does a great job of showing how each of the standard pieces of advice could be wrong. And here's another form of values impinging on household finance: The "marriageable male" effect is breaking down.


5. Digital Finance: Ignacio Mas can't be digitized. At least not yet (I'm sure Facebook is working on it). And that's a problem that ultimately comes back to financial regulations, scale and the reasons that the poor are often shut out of quality financial services. Serving poor customers is expensive relative to the profits that can be generated, unless you can scale, which means standardization, which often equates to poor service because poor customers are not uniform.

And for something completely different, but definitely relevant to digital financial services and regulation, here's a story about pressures on Uber to allow repressive governments access to their data in return for access to markets. Hmmm...I wonder what other data repressive governments might want to have access to?

 

Billy Bragg and the Blokes performing St. Monday. Have a good weekend.

Week of June 5, 2017

It's Not What You Know... Edition

1. Social Enterprise: A few weeks ago I noted that Etsy was under pressure from an activist investor for behaving like a B Corp (which it is (was?)). I missed the notice that the investor won: Etsy layed off 80 employees and fired the CEO/Chairman. Here's a piece reflecting on the Etsy saga that is emblematic of much of what I think is wrong in social enterprise rhetoric. The argument that social enterprises have to be ruthless competitors may sound good (to some) but it ignores the exact issue that is at the heart of social enterprises: how do you manage the trade-offs. It's worthless--less than worthless, I should probably say "actively harmful"--to pretend there are no trade-offs or to imply that there is value in advice like "be ruthlessly competitive except for in these parts of your business model." It's why efforts like B Corporations that don't have any governance teeth are a distraction, and why even efforts like For Benefit Corporations that do have governance teeth are fraught.

In other social enterprise-ish news, I can't resist a story about a star rapper, off-grid solar power in Senegal and Chinese investors. You can't either can you? On a more practical level here's Devanshi Vaid on the lack of information flow on social enterprise in India.

And here's Felix Salmon with some remarkably clear reframing of an important wing of social investment: if a foundation endowment can't get high investment returns in the near term, don't cut back on grantmaking, accelerate it!


2. Our Algorithmic Overlords: The Atlantic has a long piece on how cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, purportedly designed to limit centralized authority, actually can become tools of authoritarianism. You don't have to go all the way to cryptocurrencies though, as I try to frequently point out. Digital currency of any sort can easily become weaponized by authority, even authority that isn't fully authoritarian.

I wasn't sure whether to include this in "Social Enterprise" or "Our Algorithmic Overlords" because it's a bit of both, through an extraordinary lens: Venezuela's bonds. As Matt Levine relates, Goldman Sachs (sort-of) bought some bonds from Venezuela (sort-of) that (sort-of) prop up an authoritarian government apparently bent on starving people. But no one is really responsible for this decision because of the way governance of the investment funds is set-up and which all point back to an index by which fund manager performance is measured. (I know, this is confusing and complicated, but it's worth it). In this case everyone is pointing to some arbitrary set of decisions as responsible for their behavior and denying any responsibility for moral judgment. If we struggle with these issues already, how much worse are they going to get with the arbitrary set of decisions are made by an algorithm that we don't really understand?

But people are more worried about algorithms driving their cars, than about algorithms ruling their moral decisions.

3. Statistics, Research Quality and External Validity: Admittedly this is just going to be a hodge-podge of stuff loosely connected.
There's apparently some new work suggesting wide-spread errors or research misconduct in medical RCTs. I haven't had time to look at this much, so here's Andrew Gelman's thoughts which will be much better than anything I would have come up with.
Stuart Buck this week asked whether we're nearing the point of more papers about the 1970s pre-K experiments in the US than there were kids in the experiments. It got me thinking about external validity. Here's an honest question: to a first approximation, do you think there's more in common between, say, microenterprises in Zambia and the Philippines in 2017 or between Chapel Hill, NC in 1972 and Detroit in 2017?
Here's David Evans working through a framework for external validity judgments proposed by Mary Ann Bates and Rachel Glennerster. I'd have to say at this point that I'd lean toward applying lessons from Zambia to the Philippines more than from Chapel Hill to Detroit.

4. American Inequality: The major focus on inequality in America has been on income and wealth but it's not just the money, it's the instability. A substantial part of inequality of income, wealth and stability seemingly can be traced back to exclusionary zoning, which limits lower-income people from getting access to jobs and pushes up both the income and wealth of the already wealthy. Hsieh and Moretti estimate that exclusionary zoning has also "lowered aggregate US growth by more than 50% from 1964 to 2009."

And here's a review of The Financial Diaries--or alternatively, an essay on how to measure poverty--in the New York Review of Books.


5. It's Not What You Know...: Two weeks ago I made a big deal about the technology of management and how underrated it is within policy and economics. Here's a paper about spreading management technology among Indian tech start-ups, finding that peer networks work to change behavior. The authors seem to attribute this to knowledge diffusion--but based on other research I'm skeptical this is a "knowledge" story rather than a "behavior change" story.

It's not just a management knowledge story. In the energy space, product knowledge, even gained via product demonstrations from peers who are using and very satisfied with the product, fails to induce demand for solar home systems in India in another new paper. And Alcott and Greenstone show that information failures don't play a role in energy efficiency program results in the United States. I'm reminded of this earlier work by Meredith, Robinson, Walker and Wydick on health good purchasing that pretty conclusively demonstrates that the barrier to purchase isn't knowledge, it's not having the money that matters.

When will "high level machine intelligence" arrive? Is a 25% chance in the next 25 years scary or reassuring?  Source

When will "high level machine intelligence" arrive? Is a 25% chance in the next 25 years scary or reassuring? Source

Week of May 22, 2017

1. The Value of Management: If you pay any attention to the development economics world, you were probably already aware that there was unrest at the World Bank since Paul Romer became Chief Economist. Yesterday that unrest came out into full public view with stories about Romer being relieved of management responsibilities for the Development Economics Group. The news stories make everyone look bad, and don't reflect my experience with the parties involved (which is admittedly quite limited). But rather than adjudicate any of the issues, I'm going to pivot to my ongoing amazement that economists of all people seem to have so little appreciation of the value of management and specifically specialization in management. It's a learned skill! The idea that someone should be managing a department of more than 600 people because they happen to be a leading economist is bonkers.

Just look at what a little bit of management training for school principals can do for schools and test scores. Or what professional management training can do for quality of care in hospitals. That's right, management can save lives! Here's hoping that skilled management will advance the very legitimate goals of clear and useful communication in Bank reports. I can't be the only one glancing through the stories about the gender studies hoax paper and thinking it wouldn't be that hard to do the same thing for a World Bank research report.

In closing, I'm not good enough of a person to avoid noting that "and" is 16% of the World Bank's actual name and linking to Ryan Briggs' Drunk World Bank twitter account.


2. Immigration: If you weren't distracted by counting the number of "and"s in your latest piece of writing, you may have seen another controversy bubbling up in social media: Michael Clemens and Jennifer Hunt have a new paper suggesting that Borjas' finding of losses for low-wage workers from the Mariel boatlift are actually a result of a change in the composition of wage survey samples. Borjas responded first by accusing Clemens and Hunt of being tools of Silicon Valley open border enthusiasts--and essentially saying that no grant-supported research can be trusted--and only later with an attempt to defend his results with data. That attempt looks plausible until you realize that he ends up charting the outcomes for less than 20 people. David Roodman--whose earlier work on this specific issue Borjas also managed to slander by calling it "fake news"--weighs in with some typically substantive and clear points (maybe he could do some coaching for World Bank writers?). The major one from my perspective being: Borjas already had to pick through data to find a narrow slice of the population that might have been negatively affected by sudden mass immigration, and can only defend that result with a sample better suited to a local news broadcast than serious economic inquiry.

If this kind of thing fascinates you, rather than tires you, Borjas has an additional reply that is more substantive and ultimately arrives at a useful point. But the process to get there remains bizarre.

In other immigration news, here's a look at the effect of differing state approaches to immigration law enforcement, and here's an animation of Mushfiq Mobarrak making the case for the gains from migration.

3. The Precariat: The precariat is term for people in developed countries who are increasingly having to deal with volatility and instability with less protection. While I've obviously been more focused on issues related to volatility in the US because of the US Financial Diaries, the precariat is by no means confined to the United States. Here are some musings about the precariat in the UK and the implications there. Here's a piece about TD Bank/Ipsos finding substantial income volatility in Canada (which I have to note, makes no mention of the fact that they are replicating the work of USFD, Pew and/or JP Morgan Chase Institute).

Here's Carol Graham of Brookings on how the confluence of low-income and precarity lead the way to hopelessness. Here's Annie Lowery in the Atlantic examining Maine's safety net "reforms" which essentially specifically deny access to the safety net for the precariat and the poorest (making it more likely the former become the latter). Here's some wishful thinking that the Trump budget, which seeks to replicate Maine's "success" in cutting access to aid, will spur a conversation about what the safety net should look like in the age of the precariat. And of course I have to mention "The Power of Predictable Paychecks."

4. African Agriculture: You could say that there are few programs out there aimed at improving agriculture in Africa. If you were to ask the average faiV reader about issues to overcome, I think we would all rattle off a fairly similar list: lack of access to inputs, poor access to markets, limited availability of affordable credit, etc. How many of those are actually problems? Via Tavneet Suri, who is now on Twitter, here's a (wait for it) World Bank report on myths and facts about agriculture in Africa based on synthesizing a lot of recent research. As Eva Vivalt notes, it's important to think through your priors before considering new evidence (well not quite, but close enough for me) so make sure you think about your beliefs before reading.


5. Auto Audio: Since it's a holiday weekend in the US, I'm guessing that a number of readers could use something to listen to while sitting in traffic trying to get out of town. And even if you're not, here are some things worth listening to:
1) Tyler Cowen's "Conversations with Tyler" with Raj Chetty
2) Planet Money episode talking to Robert Gordon about The Rise and Fall of American Growth
3) The entire Revolutions podcast which features many fascinating hours about the American, English, French and Haitian revolutions...but let me especially recommend Series 5 on the Bolivar-led revolution in northern South America. Despite being raised in Colombia I learned for the first time the vital role Haiti played and that my great-great-great-great--more greats--grandfather funded an invasion of Venezuela in the early 1800s.

 

Week of May 15, 2017

Editor's Note: I really do wonder how many people are trying to measure the negative productivity shock to the American, and possibly global, economy. I mean, there those ridiculous annual stories about how the NCAA basketball tournament costs billions in lost productivity, so someone has to be doing this right?

1. Data (and Our Algorithmic Overlords): Many of you probably saw the Economist piece on data becoming the world's most valuable resource. It does a darn good job at producing conflicting reactions for me: Yes, we should be paying more attention to the accumulation and use of data among private companies! But governments aren't to be be trusted with this kind of data any more than private companies! And you're spending way too much time in Silicon Valley--we're a long long way from data being more valuable than physical resources for most of the people in the world!

So I'm going to use it mostly as a foil to introduce two pieces that you should read that you probably don't think are relevant to the faiV. First, here's a piece by Ted Knutson, a protagonist in the development and use of "advanced statistics" in football/soccer, about why he developed and continues to use a terrible visualization of data to evaluate player performance. Second, here's a piece about how adapting behavior based on data in baseball has helped some players but hurt others so that there is zero net gain. The point here being, understanding data is hard enough. Using data is even harder. Figuring out how to help people change based on data--without just turning everything over to our algorithmic overlords--is the toughest of all. And if you don't believe, that let me remind of you of one of my all-time favorite papers about seaweed farmers. Take that, "vast empirical literature"!


2. Theories of Change (and Demonetization): In my book of interviews of development economists on RCTs etc. the throughline is theory of change. How do ideas get translated into policy and into making the world a better place? I argue that a lot of debate about methodology is really debate about theory of change, particularly around the role of experts and the value of small vs. large changes. This Planet Money episode about the Indian demonetization has the most jaw-dropping "theory of change" story I think have ever encountered. The short version is an engineer developed--through divine inspiration--a model of the Indian economy, complete with cheesy illustrations, and just kept talking about it until a powerful politician took notice and decided to introduce one of the biggest economic shocks in modern history. If you know someone graduating from high school or college, perhaps you should make them listen to the episode rather than buying them a copy of Oh, The Places You'll Go. (Oh, and that feeling when you visit the Smithsonian with your kid and get to talk about how even our heroes fail us.)

3. Digital Finance: Over at CGAP, IPA has a post about fees for 21 mobile money services in seven different countries, with an eye to how the highest fees are paid on the smallest transactions, presumably serving as an effective tax on the poorest customers. This of course is the same issue we've been talking about in microfinance for decades: small transactions don't cost less to process than large ones and so small transactions are more expensive. While it's less of an issue in things like digital services than in-person services it doesn't entirely go away and so providers have to make decisions about whether they are going to over-charge their relatively wealthier clients to subsidize their poorer ones, or tax their poorer ones for their inability to transact in larger amounts. The problem with the former is that there is almost certainly going to be a competitor who is willing to take those wealthier clients by not asking them to subsidize costs for smaller transactions.

This also raises one of my long-term fascinations: people tend to react strongly to poor customers being charged more for financial services but not for telephone services--even when it's the same company doing it! The same poor customers who are paying more for mobile money transfers are almost certainly paying more for cellphone minutes by buying them in small increments, but I don't ever see that being charted.

4. Financial Advice: Speaking of fees for financial services, one of the things that chaos in Washington has swallowed is debate about how American investors should be charged for financial advice. There's long been concern that conflicts-of-interest lead financial advisers to push their clients into high-cost investments from which the adviser gets a commission. The Obama administration proposed changes to the rules governing financial adviser compensation and fiduciary duty that are now on hold. In the meantime, a WSJ reporter tried to figure out how much she was paying in fees on her investments. It was difficult, even though she worked with a flat-fee adviser, not one paid on commission. The answer in the end was 1.4%--Noah Smith illustrates how expensive that seemingly small number is (it's hard to interpret data!).

Matt Levine, meanwhile, illustrates how the story complicates efforts to reform financial advice and fees (scroll down to "Fiduciaries"): "If the fiduciary rule pushes investors from high-cost mutual funds recommended by commission-based advisers to medium-cost mutual funds recommended by expensive fee-based advisers -- and if investors' all-in costs aren't any lower -- then what have we gained?" Or as I would put it, financial decisions are complicated and getting good advice is going to be expensive especially for customers of modest means. Seems like households in the US, Kenya and India (for instance) may have more in common than often thought.


5. American Inequality: The new report on the Survey of Household Economics and Decision Making (SHED) is out from the Federal Reserve Board. I am, unsurprisingly, drawn immediately to the data on income and expense volatility--the survey asks more detailed questions in this area, due in part to the findings of the US Financial Diaries--on pages 23-25. Roughly a third of households report monthly income changes, with 43 percent saying the volatility comes from an irregular work schedule. Unsurprisingly, volatility is more common among blacks and Hispanics.

Speaking of the US Financial Diaries, here's my new favorite review of The Financial Diaries. And here are Jonathan and Rachel on Marketplace. And here's some counterprogramming on the state of the job market.

From the  new SHED report , the reasons people say their income varies from month-to-month. Source:  Federal Reserve Board

From the new SHED report, the reasons people say their income varies from month-to-month. Source: Federal Reserve Board

Week of May 8, 2017

Unintended Consequences Edition

1. American Inequality: The exceptionalism of the United States in promoting home ownership as the signifier of middle class status and/or upward mobility, and a generally accepted keystone of building wealth has persisted despite the Great Recession/housing crisis. But that doesn't mean that things haven't changed--the availability of housing that costs less than 30% of a household's income has dramatically decreased. Matt Desmond, author of Evicted, writes in the New York Times magazine that the American emphasis on home ownership has become one of the primary engines of inequality. Non-profits--or at least how we measure and fund them--are another (unintended) engine of inequality. In New York state, non-profits pay wages just above retail and food service (and 80 percent of these workers are women, and 50 percent people of color).

2. Our Algorithmic Overlords: The goal of machine-learning and using algorithms to analyze data is to yield better decisions, at least better than human beings would make given biases and the challenges of causal inference. A(nother) new book looking into the way this works is Everybody Lies. I haven't read it yet, but I'm looking forward to it. In the meantime, there's an excerpt in the Science of Us, taking a look at one of those areas that humans always struggle to make good decisions: who is credit-worthy. The substitution of bias against minorities (or at least people different from the loan officer) and the poor for careful judgment is well documented and wide-spread. Netzer, Lemaire and Herzenstein turn the machine loose on data from Prosper, an online platform for peer-to-peer lending, and find that the words that borrowers use are predictive of repayment behavior. You should read the whole excerpt because it does focus on the unintended consequences of using machine learning and big data. I, of course, immediately wonder how quickly borrowers and lenders will adapt to the findings.

Meanwhile, here's a Quora forum with Jennifer Doleac on the American criminal justice system, which dwells a lot on how machine learning is affecting decisions in another area humans have a lot of trouble with: who's guilty and who is a threat for recidivism. And of course, on the unintended consequences of our efforts to punish people. And here's a speculation that Donald Trump is a dynamic neural network/machine-learning algorithm with narrow goals. Here's an alternate version of the same argument, which in addition to being even more frightening, provides additional insight into the potential unintended consequences of data analysis without theory (of Mind).

3. Digital Finance: The item on Prosper and algorithms determining credit-worthiness based on language used by borrowers is about digital finance of course. But in the domain of more traditional ways of thinking about digital finance, here's a story about M-Pawa in Tanzania, interesting for it's integration of savings, lending and education. The bottom line: more savings, larger loans, better repayment. In other news, M-Pesa is supporting proposed regulations for cross-platform transfers in Kenya. And MicroSave has some ideas on how to enable digital finance among the illiterate, since traditional approaches to inclusion through digital have the unintended consequence of excluding the illiterate.

More specifically on the "unintended consequences" theme, though having relatively little to do with digital finance, here's some new research on how global de-risking in banking has cut the number of correspondent banking relationships (what makes cross-border payments even somewhat efficient) have declined by 25% since 2009, pushing whole regions out of the regulated banking sector.

4. Finance Frames: I couldn't come up with a pithy and clear intro to this item, so we're stuck with 'finance frames.' The point is that how we think about finance--the mental frames and analogies we use--have an often unintended impact on what happens in the real world. Here's a Twitter exchange that started from a discussion about how investment advice is provided to retail investors in the US (are financial advisors like store clerks?) but quickly moved on to something more globally relevant: how much financial advice is or should be like medical care. The exchange is a bit difficult to follow, but it's worth it.

I struggle with the appeal to the medical care analogy for a number of reasons, not least of which is that the comparison to health tends to idealize the provision of medical care. In fact, medical care the world over is delivered poorly, with bad or conflicting incentives, rife with misinformation and poor decisions. It's why when someone asked "do you really want a doctor that can't afford a Ferrari?" my answer is "Hell, yes." If the medical field is what finance is aspiring to, or taking it's lead from...


5. Charity and Philanthropy: Many years ago, one of the first things that got me some attention writing about charity and philanthropy was an on-going critique of "embedded giving", the jargony term for purchases that include a donation to charity. I even created a scoring mechanism for judging the campaigns! How naive I was back in my youth. A new paper from Gneezy, Gneezy, Jung and Nelson yet again proves why such schemes are suspect: they can drive up profits for businesses while driving down the amount donated. In this case people paid significantly more for products with a charitable donation but did not distinguish between 1% or 99% of the proceeds going to charity. If you were as cynical as I am, you would dispute that this is an unintended consequence. 

And here's Larry Kramer, president of the Hewlett Foundation on the unintended consequences of philanthropy's fad toward "big bets."

Economist William Baumol died last week. He did a lot of work on entrepreneurship but is probably best known for  what he called "cost disease"  which explains why the costs of goods and services can rise quickly in sectors with little productivity gains when there are large productivity gains in other sectors. One way of thinking about this is that we're spending too much time automating the wrong jobs (and relates back to "hell, yes" above. Source:  Vox

Economist William Baumol died last week. He did a lot of work on entrepreneurship but is probably best known for what he called "cost disease" which explains why the costs of goods and services can rise quickly in sectors with little productivity gains when there are large productivity gains in other sectors. One way of thinking about this is that we're spending too much time automating the wrong jobs (and relates back to "hell, yes" above. Source: Vox

Week of April 10, 2017

1. Social Investment Dissent:  Last week I had an item about "social investment wars"--unfortunately Felix Salmon's critical take ("How Not to Invest $1 Billion") on the Ford Foundation's announcement came out just a bit too late to be included. It does pair nicely with a video of Xav Briggs of the Ford Foundation talking about the decision and the future of impact investing.
In the item last week I criticized the sector for not acknowledging trade-offs, principal-agent problems and the like. To be fair, there are people in the sector talking about these issues. Here's a piece from Omidyar Network staff in SSIR about a "returns continuum" rather than "no tradeoffs." Here's a piece from Ceniarth staff concurring. And there are two recent pieces from the CFI blog on responsible exits from social investments: first, pointing out that who a social investor sells to should be part of the impact calculation, and second making an important point about the "missing middle" in social investment (though they don't use that term).

The missing middle they are pointing out is investors who are willing to buy on the secondary market but maintain social goals. This echoes a long-standing problem in foundation philanthropy: most large foundations want to be first movers and believe that there are "followers" who will come after them to support organizations or programs after the initial grants. It seems in both cases, the followers just don't meaningfully exist. 


2. Financial Literacy: April is financial literacy month in the United States at least. I continue to use financial literacy as my barometer for the evidence-based policy movement: if evidence isn't making an impact here, why should we expect to have an influence elsewhere? But on to the links. Here's perhaps the dumbest idea currently circulating--making financial literacy a requirement for high school graduation. Here's Graham Wright de-mythifying financial education in the developing world. And on a brighter note, here is IPA's review of what's been learned from impact evaluations of financial literacy programs around the world (it's not just "they don't work!").   

3. The Technology of Management: Having written a couple of books about Toyota, this is a particular fascination of mine--and of course I therefore think other people should be paying more attention to it. Management matters a lot to firm performance (explaining about 20% of firm-to-firm productivity gaps), which in turn matters a lot to wages and job creation/growth. Here's Nick Bloom in Harvard Business Review on rising firm inequality. Here's Bloom et al. on why the technology of management diverges (or alternatively, doesn't converge as much as expected given the returns).

My particular fascination is how to spread the technology of management to small firms and especially "subsistence retailers." Here's David McKenzie and Olga Puerto on an experiment training small-scale female firm owners (90% have no employees) and finding significant and lasting gains, and importantly, no evidence of negative consequences for untrained competitors. Though recall from this fall a paper on a mentoring program for male entrepreneurs in Kenya that found quick fade-out of gains from mentoring by more successful firm owners. I think there are important things to learn from the literature on subsistence agriculture interventions since this really is a similar problem--how do you get people to adopt productivity-enhancing 'technology' like better practices. In that spirit, here's an evaluation of the phase out of an agricultural extension program in Uganda, finding that demand for improved seeds does not decline, though supply does, and improved cultivation techniques are maintained.

4. Our Algorithmic Overlords: My next book of interviews is on big data and machine learning. I would say I'm paying more attention to articles on these topics but that would be reversing the causality. In Technology Review, Will Knight wonders how important it is that we understand how machine learning algorithms and neural networks work and why they reach the conclusions that they do. Fancy listening to some algorithmically-created singers? Or seeing what happens when a deep-learning algorithm tries to create children's book illustrations? On a more serious note, here's "10 simple rules for responsible big data research" in computational biology.


5. Financial Diaries: The official publication date for The Financial Diaries was this week. You really should buy and read the book, but I'm a realist, so here are some pieces to read if you're not going to do that. From Harvard Business Review, wide-spread financial vulnerability. From Marketwatch, households are saving more than it appears. From PBS Newshour, why families feel so insecure.

The gender imbalances in China and India (and elsewhere where son-preference continues to dominate) are well-known. But the actual situation is not as well understood--because families tend to hide or fail to register daughters until later in life. Source:  Nikkei Asian Review

The gender imbalances in China and India (and elsewhere where son-preference continues to dominate) are well-known. But the actual situation is not as well understood--because families tend to hide or fail to register daughters until later in life. Source: Nikkei Asian Review

Week of January 23, 2017

1. Cash Crisis (India): India's demonetization "adjustment" continues. IMTFI has begun a special series on their blog focused on demonetization; the first post has an overview of the issues with links to work from many researchers from many disciplines, and the promise of more to come. The New York Times takes a look at the knock-on effects three months after the announcement--my only quibble is the headline which implies that demonetization only now "begins to bite." 

2. Cash Crisis (US): It's certainly not sudden demonetization that's the cause of US household's troubles managing cash and cash flows. But there are struggles none-the-less. Diana Elliott of the Urban Institute looks at the budgetary effect on cities of residents who don't have $2000 in liquid savings, finding that 10 large US cities incur (via missed property tax payments, managing evictions, etc.) costs that amount to .3 to 4.6 percent of their annual budgets (the data can be found here). Lisa Servon has a new book, The Unbanking of America, which looks at how much of the traditional financial services industry has turned its back on customers who need help managing their day-to-day cash flow and short-term needs. Here's Lisa discussing her research, which included working at a check casher, a payday lender, and a debt crisis hotline, on Fresh Air, and a review from The Atlantic.

3. Policy Influence: Every week I link to new (at least to me) research--but does any of it matter? ODI has a new report on "10 Things to Know About How to Influence Policy with Research." It's also a question I ask everyone in my book on the use of randomized trials in development economics (hint, hint, nudge, nudge). Sometimes it's hard to draw the lines between basic research, research designed to inform or influence policy, and advocacy masquerading as research. Other times not so much. That particular instance from Justin Sandefur and colleagues as they respond to critics about their RCT evaluating Liberia's new charter school policy, and consider whether the research will change anyone's mind

4. QTWTAIN: For those of you with better things to do than spend hours on social media, that's "Questions To Which the Answer is No." In this case, the question seems to be "Is behavioral economics dead?" which I had no idea was even a thing people were asking. In the course of answering "no," Noah Smith provides lots of links to interesting work connecting behavioral findings to macro questions. I think the far greater challenge is the on-going roll back of confidence in behavioral/social psych findings, but I don't think anyone really thinks even that is fatal.


5. Microfinance IPOs: While I've been worrying (and continue to worry) about a move away from social investment in microcredit innovation, it's true that there have been a couple of microfinance IPOs recently. Next Billion has an interview with Dan Rozas and Anna Kanze about the new IPOs in India and what they mean for the industry. Next Billion is also hosting a Twitter chat on Microfinance IPOs on Monday the 30th, at 10:00am (GMT-5) on the topic, using #mfichat if that's your sort of thing.

A Brookings study of the relationship between being a good researcher and being a good teacher at Northwestern University, finds a precise "none." Now we just need to find a way to measure "policy influence" instead of "instructor value added." Source:  Brookings

A Brookings study of the relationship between being a good researcher and being a good teacher at Northwestern University, finds a precise "none." Now we just need to find a way to measure "policy influence" instead of "instructor value added."
Source: Brookings

Week of June 20, 2016

Note: This week’s edition of the faiV was written by FAI’s Program Administrator, JoAnne Williams. After dedicating over three years toward FAI’s mission, JoAnne will be moving on to pursue her MBA at Columbia Business School, where she plans to study Finance and Social Enterprise.


1. Financial Health: How should a financial services company assess its customers' financial health? Three financial services organizations, HelloWallet, Wells Fargo, and Solutions for Progress, have developed tools and metrics to measure the financial health of their customers. NextBillion

2. Housing Segregation: Housing instability as a repercussion of income volatility has been well documented, but what about the cycle and segregation of poverty in specific neighborhoods? Matthew Desmond's Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City and Mitchell Dunier's Ghetto: The Invention of a Place, the History of an Idea take a look at the history and complexity of living in concentrated poverty. The Atlantic Magazine - June 2016 Edition

3. Grit in Developing Countries: Is grit a useful predictor of success in developing economies? Roving Bandit

4. Financial Inclusion: Kenya has been spotlighted regionally and globally for tremendous gains in financial inclusion, but has access to formal and informal financial services reached the ultra-poor? Heyer and King discuss this question in the book Kenya's Financial Transformation in the 21st CenturyThe World Bank - All About Finance

5. Aging Workforce: A new Pew Research Center study highlights a growing trend of Americans working well into their retirement years. When compared to previous generations, older Americans are expected to stay in the labor force longer and work longer hours. 
Pew Research Center

Migration patterns leading up to Brexit.

Migration patterns leading up to Brexit.

Week of September 14, 2015

1. International Labor Mobility: FAI affiliate Michael Clemens discusses one of “the most effective development policies evaluated to date” and why it’s being ignored by major aid agencies. The Huffington Post

2. Small-Dollar Credit: Nick Bourke of The Pew Charitable Trusts suggests tweaks to the CFPB's proposed small dollar credit regulations that will allow banks to compete with payday lenders with better options for borrowers (hopefully). American Banker

3. Poverty Alleviation: "All programs have room to improve. 'Pro-poor' programs actually strive to improve toward greater effectiveness. Transparency and accountability are not just about separating wheat from chaff; they are about improving.” NextBillion

4. Microcredit in India: The Reserve Bank of India recently issued small finance bank licenses to eight MFIs, signaling a "resurrection" in what was once one of the world's most troubled markets. Livemint

5. Labor Markets: Currently, 53 million Americans are in the "1099 workforce" (part-time workers, contractors, freelancers, etc.) and that number is growing.  A new report outlines the benefits and financial challenges workers face when they operate outside traditional employment models. (Also - best report title EVER.) Core Innovation Capital

Week of August 10, 2015

1. Cash: The artisanal movement may have reached its peak. Hipsters everywhere can now pay for their hand-sharpened pencils and small-batch mayonnaise with homemade, locally crafted currencies. The New York Times

2. Household Finance: Despite recent economic growth and falling unemployment, many American workers are still struggling to save for emergencies or make ends meet.  Financial capability programs, offered through employers, may help participants alleviate some of their financial struggles through knowledge and access to products and services. CFED

3. G2P Infrastructure: The Indian Supreme Court ruled that biometric identification cannot be mandatory to receive government subsidies. Bad news for banks and financial inclusion advocates, good news for officials siphoning funds from "ghost" beneficiary accounts (see Muralidharan, Niehaus, and Sukhtankar's massive RCT). NDTV
 
4. Poverty in the US: A new study claims that while deepening income inequality is a problem in the US, increased economic and racial segregation coupled with concentrated poverty is a much bigger deal. City Lab

5. Research: IPA is hiring a Program Director to oversee all of their financial inclusion work, both US and international, including existing research and dissemination efforts and several large research funding pools. Innovations for Poverty Action

Dr. Abu S. Shonchoy is auditing implementation work during Mobile Banking Research field visit.

Week of July 27, 2015

1. Mobile Money: Vodafone and MTN announced plans to allow money transfers between East and Central African customers of either provider, marking a big step toward interoperability on the continent. The Wall Street Journal

2. Financial Management: FAI affiliate Ignacio Mas analyzes common behaviors and decision-making practices that underpin the financial management strategies of poor households. Upsides

3. Digital Payments: A new blog series explores mobile merchant payments in developing markets, with a focus on the factors it will take to build out the extensive networks necessary to provide value for both merchants and customers. CGAP

4. Financial Inclusion: When we talk about financial inclusion, we generally talk about national statistics. Researchers funded by BBVA have made an impressive attempt to better understand financial inclusion in the United States by measuring it, and some possible determinants of inclusion or exclusion, for individual metropolitan areas. BBVA

5. Microinsurance: This week marked the launch of the first edition of The State of Microinsurance, a magazine-style publication aimed at taking stock of the microinsurance sector from the point of view of various stakeholders. The Microinsurance Network 

Week of July 13, 2015

1. Savings:  A new report from the US Financial Diaries project provides evidence that lower income households are saving up for frequent, short-term emergencies that prevent the growth of long-term savings. Could 401k style auto-enrollment programs help to manage both long- and short-term savings goals? AARP

2. M-Pesa:  Is M-Pesa merely a fintech service or [cue foreboding music] "a stealth political coup by a private operator which profits only from enforcing discipline, control and transparency (via massive data capture) over a wayward system?"... Financial Times

3. ...Regardless of its characterization, new regulations could cause Safaricom to separate its mobile money service from its voice, data, and infrastructure businesses. The changes could weaken Safaricom's market position, but may be a win for competitors like Airtel. Quartz

4. Anti-poverty Policy: What is an effective way for service providers to assist low income households? For starters, cut the bandwidth tax - the time, money, and mental costs of making ends meet. Ideas42

5. Cash Transfers: The Dutch city of Utrecht is the latest to test out a basic income benefits program. But they are tweaking the experiment, offering either conditional or unconditional transfers to treatment groups. Quartz