First Week of May, 2018

For the First Time in Forever

Editor's Note: I apologize if the phrasing on the first item triggers PTSD symptoms in parents of children under 10. In other news, the paywall revolution seems to be gaining steam. I may need to start a Patreon for the faiV to afford subscriptions, but for now I'm just mourning my two favorite columnists, Justin Fox and Matt Levine, disappearing behind Bloomberg's odd paywall. --Tim Ogden

1. Microfinance, Part I (Uses of Credit): For the first time in forever, it seems there's enough new and interesting stuff on microfinance to support not only one, but a couple multiple-link items. Let's start with a useful piece that summarizes findings from several studies that have loomed large in our understanding (or questions about) of how microenterprises use credit, and apparent differences between male-owned and female-owned enterprises. I do find the framing a bit odd, as I don't know anyone who interpreted the results as "women aren't as good at running microenterprises as men" rather than, "women tend to be constrained to operating microenterprises in less profitable industries." When the newer results from Bernhardt, Field, Pande and Rigol emerged, I think the standard take was, "Households optimally allocate credit to their highest-return enterprise." So I think the intriguing thing here is not "women vs men entrepreneurs" but "maybe the industries women are concentrated in aren't less profitable after all." And that makes me think back to a paper from AEA (there's no version online that I can find, but this seems to be a significantly revised version using the same data) finding that female tailors in Ghana earn less than male tailors because they are constrained to making womens' clothes, a sector where there is more competition and lower prices.
Another use of credit for poor households is not to invest in a microenterprise but to smooth consumption when income is seasonal (or volatile for other reasons). Here's a new paper from Fink, Jack, and Masiye examining that dynamic in rural Zambia. Providing credit during the lean season affects the labor market, allowing liquidity-constrained farmers to avoid wage labor for their comparatively less-constrained neighbors, and pushes up wages. The intriguing thing here is another piece of evidence on the general equilibrium effects of microcredit via commodity (in this case, labor) markets.


2. Microfinance, Part II (Everything Else): Well, not everything else, see item 4. Access to credit and other financial services is a tricky thing--and it's not just the financial system that affects it, the justice system, criminal and civil, matters a lot too. Here's a new paper on alternative credit scoring using digital footprints--I haven't read it yet but am generally very skeptical of things like this. Grassroots Capital and CGAP are hosting a webinar on May 15th under the heading "Microfinance: Revolution or Footnote?" based on a conference last year (full disclosure, I was a participant). Of course, now I would want it to be called "Revolution, Footnote, or General Equilibrium Effects Eat Us All in the Long Run?" And applications are open for the 2018 European Microfinance Awards (until May 23) with the theme "Inclusive Finance through Technology." Whoever said the faiV didn't have news you could use? 

3. Methods/Statistics/Etc: Here's even more service journalism: A tool that will convert charts into data points automatically. I actually expect this to be the most clicked link in the history of the faiV. RAs, the robots are coming for your jobs sooner than you think.
Does everyone who cares about statistics read Andrew Gelman's blog regularly? Just in case, there were several posts recently that drew my attention. One is a fairly-standard-but-always-useful post about a specific example of dubious practices, on early childhood education (which morphs into some commentary on how the field of economics deals with these issues with a bonus appearance from Guido Imbens in the comments); another is a pointer to a new paper that tries to avoid some of the more dubious practices on a topic of a lot of interest and a lot of noise--the relationship of macro-growth and child development. But the most interesting is a post about how economists tend to see the world, specifically explaining why apparent bad behavior is good, and apparent good behavior is bad. Behavior in the economics profession is the best segue I can find into this short (audio) interview with Claudia Goldin.
But back to the use and misuse of metrics and statistics. If you don't click on anything else under this item, I do think you should look at these last two links. First, a thread about how most of the world thinks about statistics--as a tool for arriving at the answer you're looking for. And a column from Justin Fox on how pro- and anti-metrics authors end up in basically the same place--measurement is hard, and is only useful if you put the effort into doing it right.

4. Household Finance: Maybe the grab-bag is the right frame for this week's edition of the faiV. I'm including this item just so I could add this link to a look at how terribly non-poor people manage their money. One of the themes I've been increasingly talking about since the US Financial Diaries is how much even small amounts of slack obscure the sub-optimal decisions of the upper 60% of the income distribution. The analogy I make is to lean manufacturing: for the poorest people, we have drained all the slack out of the system so that when any mistake is made the consequences are large and obvious--that's the point of lean! But of course, unlike Toyota which spends massively to train workers on how to deal with mistakes, we give no useful training to these people to cope with their lack of slack, instead just blathering on to them with useless financial literacy training. Meanwhile, those with some slack are the American car companies of the 1970s, oblivious to their poor management of money. This week is when people who filed their US taxes right before the deadline will receive any refunds they were due; my strong prior is that there will be much more money wasted--even as a percentage--in the next 30 days than when the comparatively lower income families received their refunds back in February.
While we're at it, would you consider $200,000 of debt and a payment plan with the IRS for back taxes an example of "bad" financial decisions? What if the person in question was running for governor?

5. Cash Transfers: To round things out, Finland is giving up on it's "not-universal basic income" experiment since voters don't like it and they sort of already have an actual "universal basic welfare" system. There's another "not-universal basic income/cash transfer" experiment starting in the US. And here's Martin Ravallion on the pros and cons of guaranteed employment versus guaranteed income. (Channeling my inner Lant Pritchett: It's about state capacity!).   

  Part of the US inequality story that doesn't get quite as much attention, via the  NY Times Upshot .

Part of the US inequality story that doesn't get quite as much attention, via the NY Times Upshot.

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